NATE Comfort and Airflow Prep Training Course

$230.00

NATE and other industry certifications heavily concentrate Comfort and Airflow since the two items are closely related and customer usually only desire to be comfortable. Without understanding these basics, they often make embarrassing conclusions about how airflow affects comfort. For example, they may incorrectly believe that the direction of airflow affects how comfortable people feel. In reality, the airflow direction has little impact on comfort unless it blows directly into someone’s face. Instead, temperature and humidity are far more critical in determining how comfortable people feel.

HVAC technicians who don’t understand these basics can make costly mistakes that affect the comfort of building occupants.

HVAC technicians commonly fail to understand the airflow and comfort associated with air conditioning without formal training. NATE HVAC Comfort and Airflow is a great solution to learn job centric skills.

NATE and other industry certifications heavily concentrate Comfort and Airflow since the two items are closely related and customer usually only desire to be comfortable.

Without understanding these basics, they often make embarrassing conclusions about how airflow affects comfort. For example, they may incorrectly believe that the direction of airflow affects how comfortable people feel. In reality, the airflow direction has little impact on comfort unless it blows directly into someone’s face. Instead, temperature and humidity are far more critical in determining how comfortable people feel.

HVAC technicians who don’t understand these basics can make costly mistakes that affect the comfort of building occupants. Comfort is also determined by the amount of air that is moving. People will feel stuffy and uncomfortable if there is not enough air movement. On the other hand, too much air movement can be just as uncomfortable. The key is to find a balance that provides enough air movement to keep people comfortable without causing drafts or wind chill. HVAC technicians who don’t understand this can often make the mistake of creating systems that either don’t provide enough air movement or provide too much.

Finally, the level of humidity in the air can also impact comfort. People will often feel itchy and uncomfortable if the air is too dry. On the other hand, if the air is too humid, it can cause people to feel sweaty and uncomfortable. HVAC technicians who don’t understand this can often make the mistake of creating systems that are either too dry or too humid. The key is to find a balance that provides enough humidity to keep people comfortable without causing problems like mold or mildew.

By understanding these basics of comfort, HVAC technicians can avoid making costly mistakes that impact the comfort of building occupants and increase anxiety for everyone involved. Providing good air movement with temperature and humidity control can ensure that people are comfortable in their environment. By understanding these basics, HVAC technicians can provide customers with the information they need to make informed decisions about their comfort levels in their home or office building.

Here are a few examples of the content discussed in this course.

What is comfort?

Since consumers and managers usually have no idea how the HVAC runs or what it takes to repair it, they can only measure if they are comfortable!

What is Airflow?

Airflow is the movement of air through a space. The airflow volume is measured in cubic feet per minute (CFM), and the airflow velocity is in feet per minute (FPM). An HVAC system refers to the movement of conditioned air through a building.

Why is HVAC Airflow and Comfort Important?

The proper airflow is essential for an HVAC system to function correctly. If there is insufficient airflow, the system will not be able to cool or heat the space properly. Not only will this make the space uncomfortable, but it can also damage the HVAC equipment.

Technicians freely admit that measuring airflow to determine if the HVAC system delivers its rated capacity is foreign or unknown. Therefore, the air conditioning professional must be well versed in (not surprising) air conditioning and airflow.

Did you know that most (probably all) manufacturers specify that before ANY refrigerant adjustment, the system airflow must be measured and determined to be within the design scope?

The refrigerant charge and system performance could never be correct if the airflow is low. If the system is not performing correctly, we cannot deliver on the COMFORT aspects of our job. This exam domain intends to determine base skills in the Comfort and Airflow areas.

After certification, students are encouraged to enroll in intermediate and advanced comfort and airflow courses to sharpen their skills. With the upswing in variable capacity systems, the ability to confirm correct system performance is more technical and urgent than ever.

The NATE HVAC Comfort and Airflow course discusses each of the topics below. The topics align with the subject areas of several industry exams, such as NATE and ESCO.

  • Air Flow
  • Comfort
  • Comfort And Airflow
  • Controlling Humidity
  • Duct Leakage Testing
  • Ensuring Correct Cooling And Heating Balance
  • Low-Level Air Balancing
  • Optimum Start/Stop Settings For Comfort And Energy Savings
  • Overcoming “Short Cycling” Issues
  • Reducing Noise Levels
  • Systematic Air Balance Method
  • Taking Humidity And Temperature Measurements
  • The Importance Of Outside Air
  • Total External Static Pressure (TESP)
  • Troubleshooting IAQ Problems

 

Working with airflow is something that many HVAC technicians ignore but should not. NATE Comfort and Airflow training helps to fill in knowledge gaps.

Learning (not memorizing) each area of focus is crucial since when any technician is in the field, issues never present themselves as a question found on a test. Memorizing questions and answer found on a quiz card is not a solution to advancing your career. Your stress levels decrease, and your confidence substantially increases if you can learn and apply the subjects presented.

Contact team7@etech.us.com for more information on advanced training to review the prerequisites of variable capacity system Comfort Management.

 

Full Course Details

HVAC technicians commonly fail to understand the airflow and comfort associated with air conditioning without formal training. NATE HVAC Comfort and Airflow is a great solution to learn job centric skills.

NATE and other industry certifications heavily concentrate Comfort and Airflow since the two items are closely related and customer usually only desire to be comfortable.

Without understanding these basics, they often make embarrassing conclusions about how airflow affects comfort. For example, they may incorrectly believe that the direction of airflow affects how comfortable people feel. In reality, the airflow direction has little impact on comfort unless it blows directly into someone’s face. Instead, temperature and humidity are far more critical in determining how comfortable people feel.

HVAC technicians who don’t understand these basics can make costly mistakes that affect the comfort of building occupants. Comfort is also determined by the amount of air that is moving. People will feel stuffy and uncomfortable if there is not enough air movement. On the other hand, too much air movement can be just as uncomfortable. The key is to find a balance that provides enough air movement to keep people comfortable without causing drafts or wind chill. HVAC technicians who don’t understand this can often make the mistake of creating systems that either don’t provide enough air movement or provide too much.

Finally, the level of humidity in the air can also impact comfort. People will often feel itchy and uncomfortable if the air is too dry. On the other hand, if the air is too humid, it can cause people to feel sweaty and uncomfortable. HVAC technicians who don’t understand this can often make the mistake of creating systems that are either too dry or too humid. The key is to find a balance that provides enough humidity to keep people comfortable without causing problems like mold or mildew.

By understanding these basics of comfort, HVAC technicians can avoid making costly mistakes that impact the comfort of building occupants and increase anxiety for everyone involved. Providing good air movement with temperature and humidity control can ensure that people are comfortable in their environment. By understanding these basics, HVAC technicians can provide customers with the information they need to make informed decisions about their comfort levels in their home or office building.

Here are a few examples of the content discussed in this course.

What is comfort?

Since consumers and managers usually have no idea how the HVAC runs or what it takes to repair it, they can only measure if they are comfortable!

What is Airflow?

Airflow is the movement of air through a space. The airflow volume is measured in cubic feet per minute (CFM), and the airflow velocity is in feet per minute (FPM). An HVAC system refers to the movement of conditioned air through a building.

Why is HVAC Airflow and Comfort Important?

The proper airflow is essential for an HVAC system to function correctly. If there is insufficient airflow, the system will not be able to cool or heat the space properly. Not only will this make the space uncomfortable, but it can also damage the HVAC equipment.

Technicians freely admit that measuring airflow to determine if the HVAC system delivers its rated capacity is foreign or unknown. Therefore, the air conditioning professional must be well versed in (not surprising) air conditioning and airflow.

Did you know that most (probably all) manufacturers specify that before ANY refrigerant adjustment, the system airflow must be measured and determined to be within the design scope?

The refrigerant charge and system performance could never be correct if the airflow is low. If the system is not performing correctly, we cannot deliver on the COMFORT aspects of our job. This exam domain intends to determine base skills in the Comfort and Airflow areas.

After certification, students are encouraged to enroll in intermediate and advanced comfort and airflow courses to sharpen their skills. With the upswing in variable capacity systems, the ability to confirm correct system performance is more technical and urgent than ever.

The NATE HVAC Comfort and Airflow course discusses each of the topics below. The topics align with the subject areas of several industry exams, such as NATE and ESCO.

  • Air Flow
  • Comfort
  • Comfort And Airflow
  • Controlling Humidity
  • Duct Leakage Testing
  • Ensuring Correct Cooling And Heating Balance
  • Low-Level Air Balancing
  • Optimum Start/Stop Settings For Comfort And Energy Savings
  • Overcoming “Short Cycling” Issues
  • Reducing Noise Levels
  • Systematic Air Balance Method
  • Taking Humidity And Temperature Measurements
  • The Importance Of Outside Air
  • Total External Static Pressure (TESP)
  • Troubleshooting IAQ Problems

 

Working with airflow is something that many HVAC technicians ignore but should not. NATE Comfort and Airflow training helps to fill in knowledge gaps.

Learning (not memorizing) each area of focus is crucial since when any technician is in the field, issues never present themselves as a question found on a test. Memorizing questions and answer found on a quiz card is not a solution to advancing your career. Your stress levels decrease, and your confidence substantially increases if you can learn and apply the subjects presented.

Contact team7@etech.us.com for more information on advanced training to review the prerequisites of variable capacity system Comfort Management.

 

Fast Delivery - Start 1 business day processing

All enrollments are reviewed by Student Support and finanlized within 1 business day

Secure Payment Options

All Payments Processed by Stripe or Paypal

Need Assistance?